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Descending from history pages to contemporary land is not always an overwhelming feel. There are few landmarks that still carry respect for their inheritance within their fascinating architecture and one of them is Hohenzollern Castle in Germany. Hohenzoller-Castle clouds fog

As I was reading about the impeccable personality of Carol I, ruler of Romania from 1866 to 1914 and ruler of the Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen dynasty (Swabian branch of the Hohenzollern dynasty), I couldn’t help from wanting to find out more about the roots of such human essence.

Hohenzollern Castle, located about 50 kilometers south of Stuttgart is considered the ancestral seat of the Hohenzollern family, which emerged in the Middle Ages. Its history is tumultuous: it was completely destroyed and rebuilt twice until Engineer-Officer Moritz Karl Ernst von Prittwitz gave it the Gothic-Revival style look we see today. Its chambers were not permanently inhabited, but rather used as galleries for the numerous historical artifacts belonging to the Hohenzollern family.

hohenzollern-castle-germany Visiting the Hohenzollern Castle is possible by reaching station Hechingen (1 hour by train from Stuttgart). After that, you can take a bus to the Hohenzollern parking lot and then hike 20 minutes to the top. As Emperor William II stated, “The view from up here is truly worth a voyage.” St. Michel chapel (the oldest part of the complex) and the inner courtyard offer great opportunities for photographers. The castle is open daily (except Christmas) and you can check out more practical visiting information here. Admission fee for visiting the entire castle complex: € 10.00.

Hohenzoller-Castle exterior Hohenzoller-Castle clouds Hohenzoller-Castle Hozenzollern inner courtyard castle